8 secrets steakhouses don’t want you to know

Dining at a steakhouse is a no-brainer treat. Whether it’s a high-powered business meeting or to celebrate a birthday or anniversary, a meal at a steakhouse may be the best thing you eat all year. But that’s only true when it comes to taste, your sparkling steakhouse experience may have some secrets you don’t know about.

When it comes to cost, a dinner at a steakhouse can leave you feeling like your bank account has been overcooked. When it comes to fat and salt, a dinner at a steakhouse can be even less healthy than you think. And as for what’s on your plate, even if it tastes really good, it might not be what you thought you’d get (or what you’re paying for) in terms of provenance, quality or handling. Here are eight things steakhouses don’t want you to know about this so-called premium experience.

Plus, if you’re going for a burger, don’t go for these 8 worst fast food burgers to stay away from right now.

1

The secret ingredient is butter

cooking steak with butter

According to a professional chef I spoke to Taste of Home, steakhouses use a lot of butter in their cooking, often brushing it over cuts of meat even when the use of butter is not mentioned anywhere on the menu. Butter—especially clarified butter—can add flavor and even improve the glossy appearance of a cooked steak.

Eat this, not that

Eat this, not that

Subscribe to our newsletter!

2

If you order a steak well done, you may get inferior beef

well done steak

well done steak

Never mind the old debate about the right or wrong degree to which a steak should be cooked: if you like it rare, then rare is what’s best for you, and if you like it well done, then that’s the way it should be. But according to employees at the large Outback steakhouse chain, customers who ask for a steak well-done are often given a lower-quality cut of meat.

3

The steaks are baked, not grilled

grilling steak

grilling steak

You may be used to those beautiful “grill” marks on your steak, but in almost every case, that steak was not cooked on the grill, but under a broiler, via The Daily Meal. Most steakhouses use powerful infrared broilers that can achieve heat more than twice that of a home oven, quickly cooking steaks in large batches.

RELATED: 7 Secrets The Steakhouse Doesn’t Want You To Know

4

You can’t always trust the term “old age”

steak dry aged

steak dry aged

If done correctly, dry-aging a steak can add depth and complexity to the meat’s flavor, a process that can take weeks and requires close monitoring for food safety reasons. But according to YEAR, the term is also often applied to meats that have only been stored for a short time, and often in a refrigerator, not in a proper aging area. In these cases, it is a marketing ploy, not taste and quality.

5

The other secret ingredient is salt, lots of it

salt steak

salt steak

Said a professional chef Taste of Home that customers “may be shocked at how much salt we use” when seasoning steaks. A large layer of the substance is commonly added to cuts of meat, with restaurants using far more salt than a chef would ever imagine. Or you want to, due to health.

RELATED: 8 Secrets You Never Knew About Brazilian Steakhouses

6

Steakhouse markups are huge

buying steak

buying steak

A steakhouse typically pays about 30 percent of what a consumer is charged for a steak for the meat itself, according to CBS Minnesota. That means if you paid $55 for a good steak in New York, the restaurant paid less than $17 for the meat. That said, there’s a lot of work that goes into turning this raw beef into a perfect ticket, so a markup is expected, although your cost at three times the house price may still be steep.

7

Much of the Kobe beef sold in America is fake

kobe ​​beef

kobe ​​beef

According to a Grillaholics article published on Medium, only a handful of restaurants in America—fewer than 20—serve legal Kobe beef, meaning beef raised and imported from Kobe, Japan. In most cases, you will be served a steak that comes from a Wagyu/Angus hybrid herd.

RELATED: The Best Steakhouse in Every State

8

Bone-in steaks add cost, not flavor

bone in steak

bone in steak

There is a common perception that bone-in steaks taste better, with the bone imparting flavor and tenderness during the cooking process. But that’s just not the case, through Grillaholics. This bone adds weight to the steak, which allows the restaurant to charge more, but in reality, it does nothing for the flavor of the steak.

An earlier version of this article was originally published on April 15, 2022.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *