Colorado Sheriff’s Deputy Sentenced to Nearly 22 Years in Prison for Forced NC Girls to Porn

A former Colorado sheriff’s deputy has been sentenced in Charlotte to more than 21 years in prison for using the Internet to lure two 14-year-old Union County girls to commit sexual acts and then send him explicit photos and videos to create child pornography.

Vincent Potter, 38, was a 16-year veteran of a Denver-area sheriff’s office when, posing as a much younger man, he began the illicit online relationship with the girls in January 2021.

His indictment later that year charged him with nine counts of sexually exploiting a child, two counts of coercing and enticing a woman, and one count of child pornography.

Under an agreement with the US Attorney's Office in Charlotte, Vincent Potter pleaded guilty to one count of sexual exploitation.  The former Colorado sheriff's deputy was charged with child sexual exploitation, coercion and enticement of a woman and child pornography.

Under an agreement with the US Attorney’s Office in Charlotte, Vincent Potter pleaded guilty to one count of sexual exploitation. The former Colorado sheriff’s deputy was charged with child sexual exploitation, coercion and enticement of a woman and child pornography.

Under an agreement with the US Attorney’s Office in Charlotte, Potter was allowed to plead guilty to one count of sexual exploitation.

Punishment remained significant. The US Probation Office recommended 360 months. Potter’s Denver-based attorney half that amount.

On Monday, U.S. District Judge Max Cogburn agreed to a sentence of between: 262 months; Upon his release, Potter must also register as a sex offender.

US Attorney Dena King welcomed the judge’s decision.

“Potter is an online predator who contacted vulnerable children through social media and used deception, pressure and threats to coerce his young victims into sending him sexual images and videos of themselves,” King said. “Potter was a sworn law enforcement officer, which makes this case particularly troubling.”

Defense attorney Benjamin Hartford of Denver told the Charlotte Observer in a telephone interview after the hearing that the sentence was excessive given that Potter had pleaded guilty early on and provided information to Union County law enforcement that led to the arrest of a man who was having sex with one of the girls.

King’s prosecutors failed to “act in good faith” by failing to give their client adequate credit for helping a sex offender off the streets, he said.

Snapchat used to target teenagers

According to court documents in the case, Potter used Snapchat to meet one of the 14-year-olds and then began taunting and pressuring her to perform sexual acts and sharing explicit photos and videos of herself and others.

Using multiple Snapchat profiles, the sheriff’s deputy posed as a 15-year-old and a 23-year-old. First he tried to seduce the girl. He then threatened to publish the sexual images and videos she had sent if she did not comply with his demands.

During the same time period, Potter began chatting with the second 14-year-old in Union County, eventually forcing her to send her explicit images and videos of herself.

Potter pleaded guilty in March. He resigned from his job with the Adams County, Colo., sheriff’s office after his arrest, according to documents.

In a deposition, Hartford contrasted Potter’s crimes with those of celebrity sex offenders R&B singer R Kelly and Ghislaine Maxwell, the longtime partner of financier Jeffrey Epstein, who killed himself in prison after being arrested on sex charges. trafficking and abuse of young people. women.

Unlike Potter, Hartford wrote, Kelly and Maxwell each abused at least six victims over extended periods of time, showed no remorse and re-traumatized some of their victims by forcing them to testify at trials.

Kelly was sentenced to 360 months, the same sentence the government sought against Potter, despite the fact that “Vincent’s case pales in comparison to R. Kelly’s case on every level of breath and reach,” Hartford said.

The same goes for Maxwell, who received 240 months.

“My client took responsibility from the start and did what he had to do,” he said.

The government, he said, had “failed to act in good faith” by failing to reach a “fair and just solution based on the cooperation that was offered”.

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